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Category Archives: Wilson tennis racquets

Moving from the Wilson K Factor to the Wilson BLX is a fluid step forward

The choice to purchase a Wilson tennis racquet is a choice to invest in the power of the elements. The older Wilson K Factor technology and the newer Wilson BLX technological upgrade enhance racquet stiffness on the molecular level.

The Wilson K Factor

Wilson K Factor tennis racquets are getting increasingly hard to find, but if you happen to find one at a great price (as is likely to happen) you can be assured that you are getting a great playing racquet.

The four technologies that are included in all K Factor tennis racquets are: the [K]onnector, the [K]ontour Yoke, and the [K]ompact Center. These centers are specific enhancements that have been created to counteract (in a way) the total stiffness created by the [K]arophite Black frame.

[K]arophite Black is a patented material that comes from the injection of Silicon Dioxide molecules into the empty spaces between graphite fibers in the material used to make tennis racquets. Those silicon molecules are then bonded to the graphite fibers with a material found in car tires, carbon black.

The result is a stiffer frame and more power.

The Wilson BLX tennis racquets

The next step, the Wilson BLX technology includes the K Factor enhancements, but goes a step further. The material used in BLX racquets includes an added molecular substance that reduces vibration shock from the ultra stiff [K]arophite Black.

A substance that is formed from the cooling of lava rock, Basalt, has been included in the marriage of graphite, silicon dioxide, and carbon black for the ultimate combination of rock hard stiffness when striking the ball and vibration reduction for a longer game.

Wilson has continued to build upon their time proven tennis racquet enhancements, moving seamlessly from the Wilson K Factor to the Wilson BLX.

But the question is: What are the little Wilson racquet scientists working on right now, and when will it be released?

Wilson Juice and Steam Tennis Racquet Reviews

Have you heard about the new line of Wilson tennis racquets coming out for 2012? Check out these two tennis racquet reviews and see if they are right for you.

Stronger Wilson K Factor Racquets Represent Advances in Nanotechnology

Fibre optic strands

Image via Wikipedia

Guest Post by Christopher Mohr

One of the most significant advances in racquet design was the introduction of Karophite. You cannot appreciate this technology by looking at it, since it works on a microscopic level. But when you play with Wilson KFactor racquets, you’ll definitely know it’s there.

Ordinary graphite racquets are made up of fibers of this strong, yet lightweight material. If you had the ability to zoom in to view this material at microscopic levels, you would see spaces between the fibers. Wilson scientists found that these racquets could be further strengthened by placing silicon dioxide crystals in the spaces between the fibers.

Silicon dioxide may sound like some high tech space age material, but it’s actually quite plentiful in nature, appearing most often as sand or quartz.

The use of silicon dioxide crystals to improve the strength of graphite racquets became known as Wilson’s NCode technology. While this was a significant improvement, scientists found that they could take the technology even further.

Wilson scientists found that binding the silicon dioxide to carbon black and to the graphite fibers created an even stronger material for constructing tennis racquets. Thus Karophite technology was born. Several Wilson K Factor racquets using this nanotechnology are available online at DoItTennis.com.

If you could use one word to describe the K Blade 98 racquet it would be control. The 98 square inch head with its 18 x 20 string pattern and head-light were designed with control in mind. The racquet is best suited for intermediate to advanced players who supply their own power when swinging. It is not a good racquet for players who benefit from head-heavy models like those found in the Sledge Hammer line.

A racquet that has many of the K Blade 98’s features but is better for more intermediate level players is the K Blade Team. With an 18 x 19 string pattern, you still get great control, but the 104 square inch head gives you a bigger sweet spot. This model will have slightly more power than the K Blade 98 and is better suited for players with moderate to fast swings. That Venus and Serena Williams use the racquet in competition is a testament to its superiority.

The K Factor Four is another viable option for intermediate players who have a moderately fast swing, but still need a head-heavy design. The 105 square inch head with its 16 x 19 string pattern will provide a large sweet spot at the expense of some control.

If you need even more power from a racquet, the K Factor Zero is a great choice. It has a larger head size of 118 square inches with a more head-heavy design than the K Factor Four. It is best suited for beginner level players.

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